Belize - Belize News - Channel5Belize.com - Great Belize Productions - Belize Breaking News
Home » Disasters » Gales Point and Mullins River dig out from mud
Jun 4, 2008

Gales Point and Mullins River dig out from mud

Story PictureMarleni Cuellar
Here in studios, we have Kendra Griffith who is just off the boat from her trip down south to Gales Point and Mullins River who is going to show you our raw footage of what she encountered down south. Welcome Kendra. I know you made it just in time.

Kendra Griffith
Yes, literally, literally just off the boat. We went first to Gales Point Manatee and that is where we’ll start and then after that we’ll go a bit into Mullins River. Okay so this is—we went by boat of course, because it is impossible to get there by road due to the bridges that are out right and so if you can’t get there by boat then you’ll have to fly. So here we are coming in. you can’t really tell much from being out on the sea because you are just seeing the houses and the damage isn’t really apparent as yet. And unlike the other places too that we have been seeing earlier this week, these two villages, they didn’t really suffer; like houses and stuff didn’t fall or wash away.

Marleni Cuellar
I remember the aerial that we saw from Gales Point on Monday, that entire village was inundated and so we saw from the coastline that obviously, the water has went down significantly.

Kendra Griffith
Yes. The waster has receded for the most part. There’s still flooding in some areas but the water is down, thankfully. People say that it started going down last night, yesterday and today when we were walking through the village, most areas were dry and we didn’t have a part in which … the rubber boots came in handy. Okay, so the team that we went with, it was the coastguard and a Dana Team, they call them the DANA Team, and they are doing damage assessment. A member of the DANA Team was Mister Roberto Chan. The DANA Team is made up of a number of people.

Marleni Cuellar
This is a part of NEMO?

Kendra Griffith
Yes, the Ministry of Natural Resources and they have the UNDP along with them because that organisation helps us a lot when it comes to disaster management. The UNDP, they gave money for the fishing industry when we had Hurricane Dean. So we have Mister Chan to tell us what they’re looking at.

Roberto Chan, DANA Team Leader
“Well, we would look, we will assess the damage done by the flooding, the damages caused to the houses, everything that is material and what has been lost by the families or the people here in Belize.”

Kendra Griffith
“Have you all been in other areas and which?”

Roberto Chan
“Yesterday we were in Mullins River.”

Kendra Griffith
Okay, so that was Mister Chan. When we got there the coastguard team took some water for them, some Crystal Water I think it was. They got fifteen cases of water there in Gales Point. They also received five sacks of rice and five sacks of beans for them to give out to persons who were affected by the storm. So they took those to their distribution center, which is actually a primary school that’s further down in the village itself.

Marleni Cuellar
This is the distribution center?

Kendra Griffith
Yes, this is the distribution center.

Marleni Cuellar
Is it also a shelter?

Kendra Griffith
No, that’s not the shelter. The shelter is further up. When we got there some distribution was already underway. There were quite a number of people in line waiting for their supplies. The process seems to be going fairly smooth—a bit slow—but it was fine. They didn’t have any major problems there. And they were actually saying that their biggest problem is actually the water. Food isn’t that much of a problem there for them. They are, because of the bridge being out, they are having some issues; they’re stranded.

Marleni Cuellar
And so they need all the aid to come in to them because they can’t get out at all.

Kendra Griffith
And then we have miss Ionie Samuels, the chairwoman of Gales Point and she will be telling us a bit of what exactly it is that they are suffering—this not being able to travel besides just the inconvenience of just knowing that you are stranded. It’s affecting them in other areas such as just getting stuff. Things like butane, the truck can’t come in to fill up the gas tank so if something isn’t done soon then that will become a problem.

Ionie Samuels, Chair, Gales Point
“Well, right about now the water just di going down so we still yet have thing. Ih impossible fi get out ah dis village due to weh the Mullins River Bridge bruk down and ih flood. So ih impossible for us to get out.”

Kendra Griffith
“So, how does that affect you all in the village?”

Ionie Samuels
“Well, ih affect everybody bad being wi deh inna this village and we stay and we can’t come out. We noh have no means and way fi come out. we only di beg di government fi try put something by Mullins River when the flood go down so dat we could come out because the coastal road right about now flood out. When we want go by Belize City, go by Democracia and we noh have no boat. Lot ah people boat gone down, machine mess up. We noh no gas, we noh have kerosene oil. So we stay one place.”

Kendra Griffith
Now, according to Miss Samuels, they are saying that when they started to notice that the flood waters were coming up, it was in the middle of the night like it happened with most people and everybody was sleeping and here she is going to relate to us how exactly she managed to stay safe.

Marleni Cuellar
So they were caught off guard, obviously, when the water started to rise.

Kendra Griffith
Yes, we got the impression from talking to them that they just, I think people just underestimated that the water would go that high. A lot of people are saying oh I’ve been in this village forty odd years, fifty years and I’ve never seen the flood waters come so high. So some people, even when they saw the waters begin to rise they were thinking okay so I just gwein go sleep upstairs or something like that.

Marleni Cuellar
So they didn’t feel threatened at all.

Kendra Griffith
They didn’t really feel threatened until later when they see it just continued rising. Then they started to freak out and some people went and sought shelters; those who did not have and upstairs house. So that is what they did. One thing that they did say happened is that a lot of people lost their crops in the village; four hundred and fifty people there about. And farming is very big for them. That’s how they make their livelihoods; farming and fishing and most of them, if not all of them, lost all of their crops.

Marleni Cuellar
And the equipment that they use for fishing as well.

Kendra Griffith
Yes, some of them lost boats and all of that so it was pretty devastating.

Gilbert Welch, Resident, Gales Point
“The farm, day before yesterday, everything was gone.”

Kendra Griffith
“What you had there at the farm?”

Gilbert Welch
“We had about a thousand sweet peppers, about two thousand burn peppers, so much coco; couple thousand, sweet peppers, all our coconut trees, okras, sour sop trees, coconut trees. Everything scratched, our house is gone. Everything, we don’t have nothing here.”

Kendra Griffith
“How many acres?”

Gilbert Welch
“Two manzana, we have. Two acres in a manzana and everything is gone.”

Kendra Griffith
Okay, so that was Mister Gilbert Welch, he was one of the farmers. He had over two acres of land that he had planted stuff and like you heard him say, everything went. He managed to salvage nothing and he says now it’s just to go back in and try and clean up and have to start from scratch. And that is just what a lot of people have had to do because, like I said, they underestimated it and they just … you know.

Marleni Cuellar
Nobody really knew what was to come and I think we’ve seen over the past couple of days the damage that has been done to agriculture. We saw it up north, we saw it down south and we’re seeing it in Gales Point. This is something that will have future implications. We won’t necessarily feel it or nobody will be starving today, but tomorrow and down the road we will definitely be able to see what is going to happen from that.

Kendra Griffith
One of the persons that we did talk to, one that’s been there for a while, Mister Gareth Williams, he a resident and he has been there for practically his whole life and the same thing; the flood caught him unawares and we’re going to listen to how he mad it out.

Gareth Williams, Resident, Gales Point
“I feel bad man, very bad, very bad. The boat deh dah front deh di machine come back. Di boat gone, di veranda gone, di kitchen step gone. Mi wife noh gah nothing inna di house, everything blow out.

Kendra Griffith
“How high did the water come?”

Gareth Williams
“Right now ih come abut eight feet pan di street. Ih woulda ketch mi bout yah soh right yah weh you di stand up.”.

Kendra Griffith
“Where were you when the water started rising?”

Gareth Williams
“I mi deh inna mi house. Come yah man I want yoh come een yah. Yoh si how I gat mi thing dehn I have to put dehn pan top yah because the water mi deh inna di house bout at least wah foot.”

Kendra Griffith
“So you were sleeping? Weh time or so this start to happen?”

Gareth Williams
“No, I gone dah di shelter den I come back yah di morning. When I come mi boat gone and dat dah weh I meet. I know di night before I left yah water mi done tek di floor dats why I decide fi move dah di shelter.”

Kendra Griffith
“And this was about what time?”

Gareth Williams
“I noh remember weh time that. Dah some part ah di night when dah rain—ih rain two days and third, dat dah di time when I had to bail out when ih rain whole night.”

Kendra Griffith
Okay, so fortunately for Mister Williams, because he had some sort of warning he had time to put some of his stuff up higher on beds and stuff like that. So he did manage to save some things. He said that he did lose his veranda, as you can see, we had to walk up a ladder because he lost his step, his boat suffered a bit of damage. And also, his daughter lives across the street from him and she also, her house is low so she was not as fortunate to escape unscathed. That area that he lives in one of the areas that were more flooded. When we were walking to his house, that was the only bit of water that we had to wade through to get in. there was maybe half a foot of water on the road as we were getting to his house. As you can see, some people here they have their clothes drying out because that is a problem. Wet stuff everywhere, you see lines.

Marleni Cuellar
Water damage.

Kendra Griffith
Exactly, clothes lines are completely filled. You have people just having their clothes and having it drying out. Like I said, his area, was the more the lower part because you have the lagoon on both sides on that part. When you’re walking it just looks like one, it’s just melding. Both of them meld into each other. Just a little way down the road from him, lives Miss Karen Trumback and she was one of the persons who ended up losing everything that she had in her downstairs when the floods came.

Karen Trumback, Resident, Gales Point
“I see the water coming in my downstairs like six-thirty he evening so I seh wah sleep upstairs rather than jumping off my bed and get my feet wet. So I went upstairs, not knowing the water would have come so high. About three-thirty the morning a neighbour came and tell me that the water is already high and when I come downstairs I couldn’t save anything. The water was high already so I lost everything.”

Kendra Griffith
“What did you do? How did you ride out the storm?”

Karen Trumback
“I just left from een yah; me and my baby and my boy and we went by di center and there we stood until this morning.”

Kendra Griffith
“So, you all now, you’re trying to salvage …”

Karen Trumback
“Try clean up and si weh wi could get done. We noh have no dry stuff. As you notice, everything just condemned. Nothing good here.”

Kendra Griffith
“So this never happened to you?”

Karen Trumback
“Never before and I live yah forty-three years and this water never did come inside my house, never yet. With all hurricane, no water like this. First time ih ever be this way.”

Marleni Cuellar
In forty-three years.

Kendra Griffith
Exactly, and that was the sentiment that was expressed by a lot of the people. they are saying not even the hurricanes have brought this much damage and you can see there Miss Trumback having her stuff outside, the same way just trying to salvage what she can and just hanging out. There’s not enough places for people to put things to hang out to dry and it’s a good thing that the rains have let up. They’re getting a bit of drizzling, but the heavy rains, not so much. They are still trying to wash the mud out of their houses and people are resilient and as you can see like she said “ dehn just have to tek it one day at a time.” They don’t have any other choice. You can see this is inside of her house and again the clothes line. The man here who lives in this house, he wasn’t there at the time when the floods came and he came today to check on his house. He said the water—to show the level of the water he said the water was a bit above the floor of his house so it’s that high. Mister Williams tell me “ih mi wah cover yoh head if yoh di stand up right there.” so Mister Williams’ daughter, I think her family is the only that is actually in the shelter still because like I said their house was low and they suffered some of the more damage in the storm and so they are still living in the shelter and trying to make due. So we have Miss Williams and she is going to tell us a bit of how they managed to get through it.

Mildred Williams, Resident, Gales Point
“While we eena di house the water di get high. Water catch me like way yah so inna my house. The chair, everything, clothes, we couldn’t like seh try rescue lot ah thing because the thing come so sudden. I gone cross dah my ma because dehn mi di sleep. Right now dehn no have no step. Di step wash weh. Least unnu si how di stand deh like di siding di look fi let go. When di water mi deh een deh yoh si like di house siding gwein like dat soh. Like everything wet up. Wi mi call yesterday fi dehn send like blanket and clothes. Like the clothes, most ah di thing dehn wet up. We have o di dry thing pan di railing here; sheet and thing.”

Kendra Griffith
“So, what are your plans now?”

Mildred Williams
“Well, I noh really know. I can’t know weh we wah do right now because I think we wah deh like of couple days more. When wi done straighten up and get di house clean up and yoh know.”

Marleni Cuellar
So they are the only family still in the shelter right now. But the other families went to the shelter when the village was flooded noh?

Kendra Griffith
Yes, they had about fifty, over fifty people who went in the shelters. Fortunately for these areas, they have upstairs and downstairs and so some people would just go upstairs in their house to ride out the storm. I think the family is seven family members who are there and they say they have to be there a while and they are trying to make due. Some of them are watching TV.

Marleni Cuellar
This is inside the shelter?

Kendra Griffith
Yes, this is inside the shelter. They have electricity so that is good. Although some of them did tell us that sometimes in the night the electricity would go out and then the flies would descend and they would be able get little or no sleep whatsoever. But one of the things that the chairwoman did tell is, like I said, the water is a big issue for them at this moment. The reading that is, is that the pipe that feed the water that goes from the generator and feed the water to the village has broken; it separated. So there was a huge section of pipe that they would have to find a way to reconnect. They’re not sure if the generator which pumps the water from the well is working because all of that area was flooded with water and they still have to get all of that checked out. So right now the food is not that big of an issue for them. It is an issue but water really is the thing that is of primary importance and when we spoke to the coastguard who is bringing them supplies from NEMO they were saying that they will try and make that a priority. They were supposed to bring in another shipment to them and they’ll try to make most of it water. This area now that we’re coming up to is one of the places that really took the brunt of it, I would say. This is the Manatee Lodge there and they, I think as a business probably suffered the most damage financially.

Marleni Cuellar
Why did they get so much damage compared to the rest? Is it a matter of location?

Kendra Griffith
A bit of location because they are right out on the tip and also because of their inability to save anything. They have, I think the owner was saying they have about eight rooms. It’s a little fishing lodge business. Their pier broke up; both of their piers. One of the owners, Nancy Bailey and her husband, they’ll tell us that they tried to save their boats, some of their boats got damaged and everything got—you see that most of the buildings are two storeys—and so everything that was on the ground floor, they just lost. All of their stuff went; beds and everything that were in there rooms. Their kitchen got completely messed up, their washing machines … everything. You name it and it was affected. So it was really, it’s going to be a huge, huge financial loss for them at this time. And we have Miss Bailey now is going to share with us what’s the extent of the damage.

Nancy Bailey, Owner, Manatee Lodge
“It was unbelievable. By morning—we had pulled our boat right up to the land so the tip was on the edge of the land—and by morning it sank. And the water level was rising really fast so …”

Kendra Griffith
“In the morning? When?”

Nancy Bailey
“Yes ma’am. It went in here. I meet my dog pan di top of the desk cowering. As we rush things out; books and different things that we could try and rush out, I get the dog first and when I came back the bed was floating and the bed was high. It was floating, turned over, covered. In the laundry room, my washing machine was floating. In the kitchen, ih tek the deepfreeze and turn over and empty out everything. In the kitchen the water was up to here and that’s up two steps so imagine if yo go two steps higher. The water here like over by the gate, it came up to about right yah.”

Kendra Griffith
“Where were you during the night?”

Nancy Bailey
“We were upstairs and the lightning was cracking in the yard. At ten o’clock, about ten-thirty my husband and I went to bail out the boat and pull it on to the land thinking we’ll get it on higher ground. My husband is born and grown here and he said in his whole life he never si flooding like this.”

Kendra Griffith
“So all of these buildings are yours?”

Nancy Bailey
“Ye ma’am, dah fi us.”

Kendra Griffith
“It’s a business?”

Nancy Bailey
“Yes ma’am, it’s called Manatee Lodge and it’s a fishing lodge. We’re only local employer.”

Kendra Griffith
“So you all lost … what’s the extent of the damage?”

Nancy Bailey
“Oh Gosh, well pretty much everything; all the works of the lodge, all the water heater, washer, dryer, the whole kitchen, stoves refrigerator, freezer, all ah dat. Everything.”

Marleni Cuellar
So she said that they are the only local employer. About how many people do they employ?

Kendra Griffith
About eight people they would say at peak but you see like their loss is devastating and they had no insurance and so that is going to be a big problem. As you can see, it’s just covered in mud now that’s left.

Marleni Cuellar
And that’s the only business in that village.

Kendra Griffith
Yes. They are the main business.

Marleni Cuellar
And I guess they’re drawing a lot of the tourists to that area as well.

Kendra Griffith
Exactly so and they, the ironic thing is that they were just about to go and insure. She was telling her husband we have get insurance, we have to get insurance.

Marleni Cuellar
Due to the upcoming hurricane season.

Kendra Griffith
Exactly, and they never got the time. They were supposed to do that this Friday but you all know that the storm came a day before the actual start of the season we already had a storm. People, like I said—and for most Belizeans—we didn’t expect to have a storm in June, at the start of the hurricane season. The more active months are July, August, September, thereabouts almost towards the end of the season. So we know that it starts but they are not expecting anything to come and affect them. They know that it’s the start of the hurricane season and ih wah start to rain and stuff. And I think that that really is the major contributor; that people were just caught unawares and that is why there always saying; the Red Cross and so—be prepared, better be prepared, better be prepared. And I think that from now on people will try and be more prepared when they hear hurricane season.

Marleni Cuellar
I think the amount of damage that we’ve seen, this is more than a lesson learnt at this point in time.

Kendra Griffith
Yes it is. And so we left Gales Point and we made our way to Mullins River and one of the first things we see as we going in, you see the trees toppled and sitting out there on the water. Quite a number of trees were uprooted along the river due to the floods.

Marleni Cuellar
They didn’t block your way on the river at all though?

Kendra Griffith
No, it was more off to the periphery and that one, I think that helicopter was one of the helicopters trying to go and bring supplies. You can see wi di trudge through.

Marleni Cuellar
There’s your trusted rubber boots.

Kendra Griffith
Yes, I got mi cost out ah dehn. The mud in this area was really bad. Ih feel almost like quicksand or whatever. This part is another section of Mullins River. There’s not many residents in this area. This is the site further up. This is the site of the Paradise Shrimp Farm and so that’s really in this area. Who were there though, were these three guys from Toledo. They actually live in Toledo but they were working on a house there and they actually passed the floods in that house. Thankfully, it did not get to a very high level. They were upstairs again. Upstairs housing is really saving people during this thing because you could imagine if people really had bungalow housing how badly off this thing really would have been and the floodwaters never really reached them all the way up and so thankfully, they made it through the night and lightening and thunder. So it was a little bit scary for them but they managed and no real harm done to them.

Marleni Cuellar
So what else did you encounter when you were in Mullins River?

Kendra Griffith
They also took them some supplies. Again same thing, more water they took them the same thing like they did in Gales Point; rice and beans for them and you have the coastguard just unloading that. People, they are really thankful and one of the things that … you know usually during these times you always have people complaining that they’re not giving us any supplies and we did not find that at all in this.

Marleni Cuellar
And that was part of the problems that we saw after Hurricane Dean. People were complaining that we’re not getting relief fast enough. We’re definitely seeing a faster response this time around in this disaster which says something about NEMO’s preparation. People were telling us all through out that they really were thankful. And here we have now an interview with the chairwoman of Mullins River.

Irene Bernard, Chair Mullins River
“Well, actually we wake up about two o’clock so when some ah mi nephew come and knock we up and tell wi di whole village under water. Dat da mi Monday morning. We neva really know the situation mi so bad. When we wake up and we step outside this trooper, the wheel mi done nearly full with water and dat dah di highest part ah di village. After that we couldn’t get out none, none at all. We try transfer people from back yah so weh wah ker yoh dah right weh di lee bwai get weh from dehn and den he end up two to three hundred yards inna the flood water and wild cane and thing. He hold there unlit daylight until when dehn could ah mi rescue ah. During dehn time deh when the flood mi di go on we still neva know that di situation was so bad back yah dat di people dehn weh do survive they survive inna the roof ah dehn house but we mi deh more pan the higher side so we neva experience wah lot; only like water damage and thing. But everything fi dehn destroyed, destroyed. Fi di pass two days dehn di try dry dehn clothing. Dehn just get wah blanket a piece yesterday but they woulda still need some more dry clothes and thing.”

Kendra Griffith
Okay, and so that was Miss Irene Bernard and she was the chairwoman of Mullins River. Mullins River, unlike Gales Point, they have a much smaller population. It’s under a hundred of them thereabouts. The same thing like Gales Point though, a lot of them are farmers in that area and like Gales Point, they also have a lot of problems with water. The difference between them and Gales Point is that they actually get their water from the river.

Marleni Cuellar
That is definitely not a possibility.

Kendra Griffith
Exactly, it’s muddied and full with sludge. Here we have the theme throughout, clothes drying on the line but this just looked like…

Marleni Cuellar
A yard sale?

Kendra Griffith
You know, clothes just everywhere. And this is the home of the hero, I would say the hero of Mullins River. He’s a three year old boy by the name of Riley Rubio and it’s a really remarkable story for Riley in that when they were going to take him from that house to take him to the hurricane shelter their boat capsized and he washed away with the current.

Marleni Cuellar
The three year old.

Kendra Griffith
The three year old and they did not realize that he was taken. It was dark, they couldn’t see, it was a really scary thing for these people; it’s about five of them who were in this little canoe trying to make their way. Here we have Mister Risden Flowers who is going to tell us how that happened and why Riley because he’s three years old and he survived.

Risden Flowers, Resident, Mullins River
“We come yah fi d people dehn right and when we come we put ah inna di dory and from di time we reach bout fifty yards away di dory hook up inna wah clothes line and ih flip over di dory. When ih flip over di dory dah dehn everybody fight dehn life but den I turn back. I try turn but di current di fight. Then I grab wah lee gial and when di dory pin up deh so I tek di lee gial and I ker ah to the shelter deh so while dehn rest deh dah back di back ah.”

Kendra Griffith
“How many people were in the dory?”

Risden Flowers
“Six ah wi mi inna di dory. When ih capsize, two gone pan di tree and di rest ah we end up inna di water.”

Kendra Griffith
“What happened with Riley?”

Risden Flowers
“Riley get away inna di turning over, he get weh. And when he get weh we noh conscious he get weh because we mi think he deh pan di dory di hold on. Den di current ker me down by di post deh bout twenty-five yards away and I stay deh fi wah nice while and den I di hail di next lee gial and tell ah must please come because di light gone and ih pitch dark. Di only thing weh di save wi dah di lightening weh di flash. Den when flash I hail and den she come. When she come di next lady weh mi deh long wid we, she come deh too. Three ah we di hold on pan di post and I hold on and I seh maddas if I hold on yah ih no wah be no use so I decided fi put she pan my shoulder and I swim and di current ker me way bout nearly three hundred yards down and I come up back and I reach to di shelter.”

Kendra Griffith
“And what was Riley doing at this time? When did you all see him?”

Risden Flowers
“The next day morning bout seven o’clock.”

Kendra Griffith
“So he spent the whole night there?”

Risden Flowers
“Ih spend bout three and a half hours inna di bushes, inna di water.”

Kendra Griffith
“In what state was he in when you found him?”

Risden Flowers
“When I found ah he was on two lee stick di hold on, two wild cane and di float inna the water because dah like di lee spinning water dat he save inna.”

Kendra Griffith
“What kinda condition ih mi deh inna? Was he fine, was he breathing?”

Risden Flowers
“Ih mi di breathe because I yer di balling. Inna di rain I yer di balling because I get up early di morning because we mi deh da di center and I seh mek we go look fi di lee boy because I seh maddas mein I hope ih noh dead.”

Kendra Griffith
“He could swim?”

Risden Flowers
“Yeah, we teach ah. Most ah we teach fi we pickney dehn fi swim from dehn young.”

Kendra Griffith
“So when you all were going in this dory, how high was the water?”

Risden Flowers
“The water was at about right yah. I woulda seh five foot ah water.”

Kendra Griffith
“That must have been very scary.”

Risden Flowers
“Yeah, very scary.”

Kendra Griffith
So as you can see as we were talking to him, on the house there was this line somewhere about his neck which you would actually see. Here is …

Marleni Cuellar
This is Riley?

Kendra Griffith
Yes, three and a half hours he hung on and he stayed. I think that he was absolutely amazing. He was completely knocked out.

Marleni Cuellar
After three and a half hours trying to fight for you life you must be.

Kendra Griffith
That must have been some ordeal for him. They tried to wake him up a bit to see if he would talk to us but he cried a bit and gone straight back to sleep.

Marleni Cuellar
And Kendra, we know form the stories down south and the casualties that happened, that this is actually a miracle that this child survived so I’m sure they’re very thankful as well.

Kendra Griffith
This is where he ended up. This is like down the road from their house and it was in those bushes that they found him clinging to those sticks, trying the best to stay alive. And it’s a really good thing that he knew how to swim. I don’t think that him, not knowing to swim, would have survived. If you don’t know how to swim, you don’t know what to do, the panic would set in and that is what would have happened to him but I’m sure, knowing how to swim, probably went into a situation where he would know what to do if he was in the water and I would say that that really is what kept him alive out there for those couple of hours. And really, none worse for the weird, no bruises or anything like that. And so after we tried to rouse Riley we decided to let him sleep, he deserved it we went out to see the Mullins River Bridge and my goodness, I was at a loss for words. You see that tree, that thing that’s sticking up there in the middle of the river, that is actually the opposite of the—you see those three slabs over there? That’s the three slabs that held up over our side of the bridge that’s in the middle of the river and the bridge itself is somewhere, a couple of yards down. You can see it just washed away.

Marleni Cuellar
So it fell into the river.

Kendra Griffith
Yes, it just broke off. That was completely amazing to see that and the bridge is just… and at least unlike the Kendal Bridge, you see it.

Marleni Cuellar
Janelle and I had a hard time trying—well we never found the Kendal Bridge—but there is the Mullins River Bridge somewhere near where it should be.

Kendra Griffith
Stuck right there in the mud. I don’t know how dehn wah even get that out of there. It’s just really amazing that water has so much force that it would be able to topple bridges like that. It just goes to show and the thing is that what was a bit perplexing to us was that they did not lose a lot of homes. Homes did not fall to the ground or things like that. They’re thinking that maybe the floods in that area did not come in a flash and just swoop in with the force because a lot of the houses are still standing. That is it and the same thing because there is no bridge we have people have to be crossing in canoes and stuff like that.

Marleni Cuellar
And there are the recovery efforts that have to be made after this as obviously, this bridge is of utmost importance to the people of Mullins River.

Kendra Griffith
And Gales Point, it’s their way to get out and get to stores and get schools and things like that.

Marleni Cuellar
The key thing is resuming some state of normalcy. So we want to thank you very much Kendra and George Tillett, the cameraman who went out with you today. Reminder, once again they are just off the boat from down south and we felt obliged to bring this footage to our viewers so that you could see what they encountered down there.

Kendra Griffith
Before you go I just want to thank a couple people; the chairwomen of the villages. They were really, really helpful to us, the coastguard Mister Sambula for getting us there safely and getting us back safely and the DANA Team and they were really accommodating to us and we really appreciate it.

Marleni Cuellar
Thank you very much again, Kendra.


Viewers please note: This Internet newscast is a verbatim transcript of our evening television newscast. Where speakers use Kriol, we attempt to faithfully reproduce the quotes using a standard spelling system.

Advertise Here

Leave a Reply

CAPTCHA Image
*