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Feb 14, 2023

Have You Tried Grilled Breadfruit or a Breadfruit Taco?

Fry it, steam it, grill it, boil it, cook it up whatever way you like – this versatile fruit found in this region during the early months of the year is a popular favorite in Belize and beyond. Breadfruit is exceptionally versatile and can be cooked at different stages of ripeness. One Belizean chef is taking the fruit and making it the centerpiece of all his menu items.  Owner of Stone Kraab Restaurant in Dangriga, Tim August, is now taking his kitchen on the road along with his vast array of breadfruit meals. He’s looking forward to serving you breadfruit in ways you’ve never imagined. News Five’s Marion Ali reports on tonight’s Kulcha Tuesday.

 

Marion Ali, Reporting

If you like breadfruit, then you’ll love the number of ways that Chef Tim August shows how you can serve it up. He came to Belize City to show us his skills in using this starchy fruit.

 

Tim August

Tim August, Chef, Owner, Stone Kraab Restaurant

“We are here to promote, uh, Breadfruit. The season is coming to an end, and I am going on a small little tour, um, promoting the use of Breadfruit as an alternative to potatoes and corn and things like that. So, as opposed to using flour and fries today, we are using just the Breadfruit. So we have Breadfruit, burger, Breadfruit, quesadilla, Breadfruit, nachos. Anything you think? Yeah, anything you can make from flour or corn. We’re making it from Breadfruit.”

 

From his mobile kitchen, August whipped up several meals he had on sale that day. For him, breadfruit is a win-win because not only is it healthier than starchy potatoes, but pound for pound, it is also cheaper.

 

Tim August

“Breadfruit has a lot more health benefits than potatoes, and what gets me is the price. Uh, potato is two-fifty a pound, and Breadfruit is about fifty cents a pound. So if you’re, if you’re doing, if you’re the time in this time that everything is going up and you want to save some money and cut cars on, on food and stuff, And Breadfruit is readily available in Belize, so why not? You know, um, it’s a traditional, uh, fruit, and it’s full of vitamins and nutrients, and I want more Belizeans to start using Breadfruit instead of just falling under the trees. And then we’re going to buy frozen, frozen potato fries in bags.”

 

August said he had been exploring different methods of preparing breadfruit for several years. His repertoire is impressive.

 

Tim August

“I’ve been using Breadfruit now for about seven years, and I’ve practiced Breadfruit in any way. You, you wish it, and I dish it. I’ve substituted the corn for, for, uh, nachos with breadfruit chips. In the tacos, I have used breadfruit shells. For the quesadillas, I use the round–like tortilla; for the burgers, I use the top on the bottom of the Breadfruit as the bun. And so it has been amazing practicing and doing. People are just used to cutting up Breadfruit and frying it, but I’m taking it up a, a not more, a couple notches, a couple notches more.”

 

August is so serious about promoting the use of breadfruit that he has teamed up with another businessman to import breadfruit trees into Belize.

 

Tim August

“I want people to start using Breadfruit. Um, we have a group in Belize, um, and we are there in protein breadfruit right now. And so if you’re interested in planting Breadfruit, you can get in touch with me too or Mr. John Arana in Belmopan. He’s importing breadfruit trees and you can, we want to start planting breadfruit trees and making it be, I hear people talking about food security and food dish and food that, but I believe that Breadfruit is a way to go for food security. As long as you have Breadfruit, you will not go hungry because you can make lab, you can make porridges, anything.”

August says that by sharing his knowledge of the wonders of the Breadfruit, even resorts and restaurants are latching on to his idea of the Breadfruit as part of the menu. But how did August get to this level?

 

Tim August

“One day I, um, in my small restaurant I ran out of, um, potato fries and I had a breadfruit that a friend had brought for me and I said, let me cut this thing up and see if I sell it as a substitute to fries if people will go for it. And when I send it outside, the customer, ask for another order and another order. And then I said, this is look like something. And so I start pushing it, and the next thing you know, it blew up.”

 

August calls himself the breadfruit king of Belize. But his experience in 2022 left him far from feeling like royalty. He had two terribly unfortunate breaks when the floods struck the Dangriga beach where his restaurant is located, and then thieves broke in and wiped out all his investments. To share his breadfruit dishes, he simply needs your support to get back on his feet.

 

Tim August

“If you buy from me, it’ll help me to, you know, get back on my feet, and reopen my small business in Dangriga. So right now we are just doing, I have a restaurant in Dangriga, but right now we are just doing the mobile truck. We’re right opposite the Bowen and Bowen or I go sometimes on the main street.

Sometimes we go to the games, sometimes we go to different parts like Belmopan, PG, so we’re all over the place.”

 

Depending on what you order, the food ranges from seven to twelve dollars per lunch plate. Dinner usually sells for a bit more. Marion Ali for News Five.

 

If Tim August looked familiar in that story, it’s because he is the chef who introduced us to his famous obeah sauce, a citrus dipping sauce, which he also serves with his meals. He makes the sauce in six different flavors, also depending on the season of fruits such as mango and pineapple.


Viewers please note: This Internet newscast is a verbatim transcript of our evening television newscast. Where speakers use Kriol, we attempt to faithfully reproduce the quotes using a standard spelling system.

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