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Aug 7, 2012

Business end of hurricane preparedness

Earlier in the day, hardware stores across the country saw an influx of customers who were seeking supplies to fortify their homes against the winds and rains that would come from Hurricane Ernesto. News Five’s Jose Sanchez spoke to vendors and customers about the type of supplies that would protect their homes and even keep their lights on during hurricane season 2012.

 

Carlo Habet, Brother Habet

“Well, you know it’s the typical hurricane preparedness stuff. Number one is always plywood, second to go with that you have the nails, sometimes screws. You find people want stuff to fasten things down so they get rope, chain for instance, duct tape. We’ve actually seen a lot of flashlights and batteries going. We have some cool lanterns that are like you can plug it in then you plug it out when the blackout comes then it has battery, so that’s a big seller.

 

Jose Sanchez

“Now, for those who did not get their supplies today—I know you’re closing at twelve—what time will you be opening tomorrow? Do you expect any change?

 

Carlo Habet

Carlo Habet

“Yeah, well we’re closing twelve mainly because we kinda have to—we’re going by NEMO and what they’re recommending. They’re recommending that we close at twelve and people came in pretty early anyway to get what they needed to get. So we’re saying as soon as the all clear is given. But if everything goes well and the all clear is given eight o’clock tomorrow, we’ll be open at eight o’clock tomorrow ready to service those who need to fix things and rebuild. We’re hoping for the best and we’re hoping that this thing does miss us, but in the case that something happens then we are ready to provide Belizeans with the tools that they need to get back to normal.

 

Jose Sanchez

Okay, so for those who come later, there’s no chance that no one will be around with some extra plywood to say okay, here’s what I can do?

 

Carlo Habet

“We’ll probably be around a little bit after twelve but probably by one we’ll just have to just vacate.”

 

Raymond Matus

Raymond Matus, Proprietor, Raysin Cycles

“You know in the case of emergencies it’s always good to have a backup power supply. A lot of people go for the big and heavy stuff but I’m always trying to advise to go with something smaller, fuel efficient, quiet—you know it won’t disturb your neighbors—and you can still have very good electricity.”

 

Jose Sanchez

“Now, for an overnight situation like a hurricane, what all can you plug into a typically small generator and what’s the cost factor?

 

Raymond Matus

Normally, I always advise people to go with a small generator, especially for emergency purposes. We have the good one like a Ryobi, it’s an inverter series, it’s very fuel efficient, it’s very light, it’s easily transportable. They also call them the suitcase generators because you can pull it about like a roley poley and it has attractive colors. Imagine getting about six hours run time on a two thousand watt generator for about a gallon of fuel.”

 

Jose Sanchez

“And how many things can be plugged into a small generator?

 

Raymond Matus

“All your emergency stuff like your radio, TV, computer. You can separate the items and you can have a small refrigerator or a microwave oven.”

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